madebymellowyel:

heyarrrrnold:

madebymellowyel:

heyarrrrnold:

My favorite 2NE1 party banger also happens to be one of their most underrated b-sides.

SO BABY BOUNCE BOUNCE BOUNCE KEEP MOVING LESS GO

Except you didn’t like it when it came out! http://mcrothsresidence.com/2010/09/09/review-to-anyone-by-2ne1-with-blogger-tuc/

Don’t ask me how I remembered this. Likely I’m still bitter from being the only person who appreciated the song when that album dropped. I would listen to it and then get sad because there was no one for me to enjoy it with. So I guess I’m calling you out as payback. And also documenting that I have successfully taken you away from ballads and into the dark side of cray-cray dance music. You’re welcome.

Hahaha! Oh man, I totally remember really disliking a lot of kpop back then for reasons that I, admittedly, really like now. My outlook on things has changed tremendously through the years and I think it says a lot about where I’ve come post-reviewer era. I felt an obligation to be a critic, and with that came a ton of silly responsibilities like nitpicking and the art of seeking explanation.

Now, I’m just like: “eff the critics, eff the standards. Let’s dance!!!!11!!!1!1”

Okay, somehow forgot to respond to this, but I totally feel you. It’s part of the reason I decided to stay away from being a “music critic” in the traditional sense - I like being able to stick to my own standards as opposed to what everyone else thinks I should use, and throw those standards out when I feel like it. The best I can do is share music I like and try to explain why I like it. Past that it just becomes an exercise in self-aggrandizement - “Look how smart I am, look what great taste I have,” etc.

Can i just chime in and say I agree totally. I studied musicology and it took me like two years to finally understand Asian pop without having to reference Western music crit culture, that’s how ingrained it was. Thank fuck I’m out of that bubble!

i kind of hope that this comeback never happens because the hype surrounding this blurry video is probably more glorious than anything reality could actually give us

something’s happened this morning where it’s like i finally got my mojo back and feel totally chill about where i’m at. it felt like the last few years since my best friend left i’ve been living outside of my body but today i finally feel like i’m the same person i used to be. and i love my friends and family so much and i’m so glad that so many of them are still with me. 


Meiji Period Bingata (or ‘red style’) dyed furoshiki (or ‘wrapping cloth’) — design: cranes, tortoise shell, pine, bamboo, and plums
[from the Okinawa Prefecture, c. 1868-1912; via the Japanese Agency of Cultural Affairs]

fuuu the article i wrote about SNSD has had over 17,000 views in like three days. 

i really love this song, it’s on an LP of Okinawan folk music I bought at makishi markets. but i don’t know much about it. i wish i knew what the lyrics were about. 

Edit: Is this てぃんさぐぬ花? The melody sounds similar but the lyrics are really different to the usual verses. Maybe these are different verses passed down from a different region or singer? Or maybe her own lyrics? 

surgingfist:

This is a great piece from The Guardian about how music and culture are combining to combat brute force politics.

"Our job as musicians should be to celebrate the good and do something about fixing the bad," said Kina, who some have called Okinawa’s answer to Bob Marley. "That’s why I hate the military bases here, but I love Americans."

And then.

The spirit of resistance pioneered by Kina is to be found in the more eclectic music of Tatsumi Chibana, a quietly spoken 33-year-old university graduate and perhaps the most visible of Okinawa’s new generation of rebel artists, fusing traditional sounds with rock, reggae and hip-hop.

It goes on to cover some interesting points on Okinawa`s cultural waves. Be sure to take a couple of minutes to watch the video interview with Lisa Nagamine.